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objected because obviously there's- ways to fight tear riz m with education but i said i do this to promote peace and i started 8 years before 911 and this is about promoting peace through education. i've worked afghanistan and pakistan many years and i said we need to have a tribal council. i went to manhattan in the fall of 2005 and the big boss of the whole group, nancy shepherd and carlin coburn in publicity. we met in a little room and i stated my case and they said, this is your first book so you need to listen to a few things here. first of all only 12 percent of nonfiction books make a profit and 2/3 are pre chosen by the publisher. we'd like to put our marketing arm behind us but your having to fight tear riz m to this. since i grew up in africa and worked pakistan for many years you never settle a deal without driving a hard bargain so i said if the hard cover doesn't do well, i'd like the subtitle changed later on for the paper back. julia and our other board relently pounded away month after month. i was in pakistan of december of 2006 and there was a new editor on the book and
challenge that harvard business school faces today? >> business education in america itself has become stagnant. all of the growth in business schools is in places like china and india and brazil and eastern europe. we're a great american business school in a great american century. people came to the united states because they thought that this was the center of management practice and management innovation. but now if you were to try and educate leaders who have to operate in the world in what i you this of as this new global century of business by teaching them just about american education, i think we would be irresponsible to our mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world. >> in a nutshell the biggest challenge that you face is competition? >> yes. it seems surprising. you would think there isn't a competition for harvard business school, but people are coming up with different models. we have students, all 900 of our students in the first year are currently in january scattered all around the world, trying to understand globalization. they've all been asked t
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
, education, and agriculture. security is a very minor part, but an important part, but a very minor part. i think that is probably as it should be. the defense strategic guidance that i referred to in my opening comment tells me that in africa, we are to seek a light footprint and innovative approaches and low costs approaches to achieving the united states security objective. we have one base in africa. we have about 2000 people. it supports not only u.s. africa command, but u.s. central command and the transportation command as well. that is our residence on the continent. -- that is our presence on the continent. there are 100 personnel who are supporting africans in the effort to joseph kony and his senior lieutenants to justice. they are indicted by the international criminal court. there is a u.s. log that tells us to do that -- u.s. law that tells us to do that. if there is a law that tells us to do that, we go and do that. and it is important part of the consideration. as i mentioned, i have been to or need to of the different countries. -- i have been to 42 other different countrie
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
more short-term as well as more structural limits long-term like education and research. >> this is the issue that everyone is dealing with around the world. many nations, trying to figure out do you do austerity or do you invest in some of these very important areas such as education and is infrastructure? would you like to see more stimulus coming out of the ecb? >> i let the ecb decide on its monetary policy. i have read carefully the report and christine legarde's statements about the need to continue with accommodative monetary policy. to my mind, it's important that our policy mixes correct overall and it means that we need to continue with smart and prudent fiscal consolidation because it's so high, about 90% in europe. it is also a drag on growth. and at the same time, we have to ensure that the composition of consolidation is growth friendly so that we did not hamper elements like education, innovation and research. it's very important for future, medium and long-term economic growth. >> are there sectors in europe that you think will drive the growth more so th
that are the highest risk of poor health are those with poor resources, poor financial resources, poor educational resources, because they may not make good judgments or have access to health care when it's very essential, or when it's crucial in prevention of progression of an illness. david bennett: but for many people in the world, their demands in terms of health are mu more modest. the people who face hunger, who face the threat of disease constantly, for them, survival is really health. to see the very quiet, subtle way in which communities can pull together is really quite remarkable. if we have that very broad definition, then everything becomes health. if we look only at certain narrowly defined diseases, we miss somehow the whole interaction that makes up the human being. the whole interaction that makes up the health of a human being begins with a genetic map. dean hamer: dna is like a blueprint that determines not t only our physical bodie, but also, at least in part, our brains. and our brains, of course, are what control our behavior, and so, although it surprises some people, our ge
litigate around the country and to public education on lgbt and hiv-r elated rights issues. host: republican line. gloria, good morning. caller: good morning, gentlemen. thank you for taking my call to my family is six generations and the great state of california, and we have seen many changes take place, especially with regard to the issues that are on your program today. i am sure you probably know that in the 1950's, the greektown of san diego -- not san diego, san francisco, passed the ordinance to protect homosexuals from being attacked. you would go to jail if you beat someone out or when after someone and cause them harm because of their sexual preference. but we've also seen in the great state of california this issue turned into a mainly a white, very well established, male- dominated issue. the men who are gay in this state are not pork, they are not an agitated, and they -- not poor, not uneducated, and they are long on opportunity. i think the issue of not allowing people to have a say on what their preference is is a difficult and unpleasant hill to swallow. we've
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
on what's working and what's not. >> we seem to think that education's a thing, like a vaccine that can be designed from afar and simply injected into our children. >> the embattled oakland police department brings on an expensive consultant, but his tough tactics are generating controversy. >> i vote against this contract tonight is not about not being serious about crime. >> apple stock takes a plunge. it's something taking a bite out of innovation at the silicon valley giant. >>> plus. i'm here at the new sfja strzz center in san francisco. we'll go on a behind the scenes tour to find out what makes this place so groundbreaking. coming up.
-- hospitalizations and deaths spiked last week especially among the elderly. >>> no. 3, d.c.'s board of education is considering letting high school students graduate without an advanced level course in u.s. government as a proposal that raises the number of required sports credit adding allowances for team sports and musical performances. no. 2, weekend track work on metro continues now through sunday night, delays of 20 minutes or more on the red, orange and green lines. trains will single track. no work is scheduled on the blue or yellow line. no. 1, stock up on forever stamps this weekend. sunday first class stamps go up to 46 cents. postcards are also going up a penny to 33 cents. the price hike is part of the u.s. postal service's ongoing effort to fund itself and that's a look at tonight's fox 5 top five. >>> students at brigham young university in utah having some winter fun, a downfall of freezing rain having the campus covered in ice. two students are sliding across a bridge path. the winter has been mild. the government said finally winter redeem the itself. i was in utah a couple week
of you. and our goal is to educate people so that this great depression can never happen again. but it's very much in the wake oof the time an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills we will all be okay spent the dark set of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on after words on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like this on facebook. >> i think it's all an evolutionary process. you go into this role and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you're always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues you care about. you are never done. so there's never a point in time where you feel like, they are, i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. they changed is given the status issues of the country, and you never know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and fluid, and open to revolve. >> the first ladies, their private and public lives. c-span is teaming up with the white house historical association for a fi
the cool ant goes and how they keep that separate from the oil. getting a makerbot is also an education in how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. >> host: are you the inventer? >> guest: you can blame me. [laughter] where did you come up with the idea? >> guest: you know, 3-d printers have been around for about 25 years, but they were mainframe-size machines that were really expensive. i wanted one. but i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together, and we started tinkering. and when it worked, we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot and the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn, new york, one of the ottest products on -- hottest products here on the floor of ces. [inaudible conversations] >> host: and you've been watching "the communicators" on c-span from las vegas and ces international 2013, the technology show. we will be back next week with more programming from this con convention. >> david maraniss began researching and writing his tenth b
, whether it's global health or whether it is education, we are doing things that are making a difference in people's lives with respect to those rights. i am absolutely committed -- usaid gets criticized and there have been some obvious problems with our contractor-aide relationships in the past. the committee i i think did superb work in putting a -- out a report with respect to that, but i think we can do more than we are doing today. >> i appreciate that. we had -- you just had the discussion with senator risch on russia, we have seen some slippage since the breakup of the cold war ending, you mentioned secretary kissinger's comments in 1994, the complexity of this arrangement. we have seen slippage. we have seen slippage in russia with their human rights tensions. there's been slippage among our allies in france, what's happened in hungary with recent elections in the government changing, trying to change the constitutional protections. slippage in the ukraine with imprisoning their opposition. our roolingsshep -- relationship where other countries can be ma thure enough where we can
in the appropriate ways whether it be health and human services or education. we will of course do that. reporter>> governor brown says building a rainy day fund is key because our surplus could be wiped out by decisions made by the federal government on health care for example. which could cost our state billions of the dollars. in sacramento, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and at ktvu.com we posted more video of the governor's state of state address. look for the video player right there on our home page. >>> the district attorney has decided she will not bring charges against senior officials at a state park's department for hiding millions of the dollars in state funds. a report from california's attorney general accused state park officials of keeping a secret slush fund even as they threatened to close seven state parks because of funds. camela harris forwarded the report to the d. a however the d.a.'s office now says it would be difficult to prove wrong doing plus the money was never spent and nobody profited from the scream. >>> i've seen him some where. >> ktvu shows you the ske
whether it be health and human services or education. we will of course do that. reporter>> governor brown says building a rainy day fund is key because our surplus could be wiped out by decisions made by the federal government on health care for example. which could cost our state billions of the dollars. in sacramento, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and at ktvu.com we posted more video of the governor's state of state address. look for the video player right there on our home page. >>> the district attorney has decided she will not bring charges against senior officials at a state park's department for hiding millions of the dollars in state funds. a report from california's attorney general accused state park officials of keeping a secret slush fund even as they threatened to close seven state parks because of funds. camela harris forwarded the report to the d. a however the d.a.'s office now says it would be difficult to prove wrong doing plus the money was never spent and nobody profited from the scream. >>> i've seen him some where. >> ktvu shows you the sketch of an attempt
whether it's bridges and roads, medical research, education or any number of other things that fall in the discretionary category to the defense spending. i simply say unless they have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking ability to make decisions about how we as discretionary spending, and left to get control of that, everybody will fall short of what they want. so i'm not debating whether more money should go into medical research versus building bridges for infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all of that is squeezed and therefore asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the back don't encourage to stand up and say we have to address this for everybody loses. and that is the message of the day and now we have no election over that issue. for having a debate in congress every day over that issue. to this point, the president has not indicated postelection that he thought that it used about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we
measures to allow more americans to travel freely. relatives to travel for religious, cultural, educational purposes. i think that's a good thing. i hope that you'll find a way to continue that and to continue more innovative approaches to deal with change their akaka with regard to the united nations for a minute that p.a. was granted unesco in 2011 and then again in 2012. full membership by the general assembly that and many of ours is an impediment to the investigations that have to happen. the general assembly is have a habit of doing this over the years and decades remember in the 70's the designated the plo as a representative to really spent time in southern africa. they had designated one of the parties as the sole and authentic representative of the people, and that did nothing but delay meaningful negotiations between the parties that need it to happen. from your position at the state department, to what measures would be take to ensure that our position, the congress's position is to deny funding to some of these u.n. organs if such reference is made. i know there is some wiggle
father taught me to value education. he was such a tyrant and a threat in me to go back to mexico. it really was scary. i believe tim. i did not want to go back. i wanted to make him proud and because i a day than to break in one negative bring me i felt i owed him that i did not want him to say i should not have brought you. that is what motivated me to do well in school for the things that i wanted to do because i did not want to hear that ever. he never said that. he didn't but as i was writing the book i wanted to make sure he did not come across as the villain. i wanted to give him his humanity. he had great things, my dad. also dealing with a lot of difficulties that unfortunately affected our relationship. >>host: you talk about how you wanted to go to church one sunday and he held up the budweiser saying this is my god. >>guest: he died from liver cancer last year. he was diagnosed with cirrhosis in 1993 and never told us and kept drinking. he actually gave up drinking in the late nineties and became a very religious. a seventh-day adventist. but he never got himself to ac
the age of 21. and it is growing. if they did not find jobs, if they deny get educated, if we do not do something, all of us at the end of the developed world, including china, russia, south korea, brazil, mexico, those developed countries that have the capacity will have to come together and about this. everybody is affected. i think that is a challenge for all of us. that is my response to a very big question that is a legitimate questions. we ought to sit down and work on this over the days ahead. >> thank you, mr. chairman. senator kerry tom hines thrilled to be here -- senator kerry, i am in built to be here. i cannot think of anyone better to continue the efforts of the current administration. thank you for being willing to take on this task. that may well in your family -- let me welcome your family. let me just say i look forward to casting level -- casting my vote in support of u.s. secretary of state and the also join the in defending the red sox and the patriots. >> finally. thank you. >> i want to echo the concern about continuing to support an agenda that urges equal rights
. this is renowned author, educator and political activist angela davis who spoke last night, founder of the group critical resistance, a grassroots effort to in the prison industrial complex. davis voiced support for president obama, the said much work needs to be done. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential the agendas. our passionate support for president barack obama and it is wonderful that we can say for the second time, president barack obama, and we support him and are passionate about that support. but that support should also be expressed in our determination to raise issues that have largely been ignored or not appropriately addressed by the administration. and let me say that we are aware that we should be celebrating, critically celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. [applause] there should be massive celebrations this year. what has happened other than the film "lincoln"? and of course with 2.5 million people behind bars today, the prison system, the immigrant detention system are terrible remain
for their continued expansion as a member of the committee on education and the work force. mr. speaker, school choice is an idea that transcends ideology and party affiliation, providing opportunities that every child deserves. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman given one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, there is good news about energy. we have untapped natural resources here at home. in the united states we have natural gas that can be turned into liquefies natural gas. other nations don't have this. we have so much natural gas that we can export it by selling it as l.n.g. not only will it bring money and energy back home, it will create jobs. this means jobs and capital for americans and american companies. even the department of energy says that expanded export of l.n.g. will benefit the united states' economy. in 201
in the severely mentally ill to obtain them in the first place. we must export educational programs that promote responsible gun ownership while addressing ways to go to court by gun violence culture in our country. we incorporate mental health records, we must also make sure and provides a commitment to goodness of mental health services to those in need on the front end. i understand there's a population of american citizens who's ever experienced with a gun has been able to the our individuals like myself as every expense with the gun has been a positive one. some of our fondest memories are spent with family and friends. i hope the inclusion of at least one sportsman's perspective in this discussion will provide at least a clear starting point by which we can have an honest discussion about ways to protect our children while also preserving the rights of sportsmen and recreational shooters. i would be first and i don't have all the answers to the complex problems that we we discussing here today, and many and i may not agree with all the policy proposals that will be offered, but i do know t
their children. getting an education, working hard. in many cases starting up their businesses and living the american dream and we ought to find a way to make that more possible. now, that also means we live in a society of rules and so we need to abide by the laws that i think there are practical ways to abide by those lawses. and any ethnic group no matter where they come from, should live the american dreams and what it stands for. >> greta: what do you do about those illegally here in this country? have you thought about that? that's one of the thornier issues. >> well, clearly there's got to be a well thought-out process in doing this, a balance between respect for the law and all the talk about securing the border, which is important, is that we've got a mess when it comes to the federal agency that controls immigration. we've got people who want to come in and work hard and live the american dream. i don't care if they come from mexico, canada, europe, africa, they want to come here and add value, work hard and live the american dream. that's what america is all about and-- >> but
: our job here is to educate the public, not to entertain them. they ran up deficits on the republican side of $6 trillion during an eight-year period of time. $2.3 trillion worth of tax cuts and two wars, and now they come back today with a glitzy proposal, no work, no pay. institutional memory. you remember term limi. remember those in favor say aye line-item veto, the constitutional theorists, they got rid of that. and how about they were going to pass a balanced budget amendment to the constitution? my dad used to say, at least jesse james had enough personal respect to wear a mask. the ople that put into this situation are now quibbling about raising the debt ceiling when they almost broke the country with the proposals that they offered all those years and never once did they ask president bush. not once did they deny president bush on those proposals. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. mr. camp: i yield one minute to a distinguished member of the ways and means committee, the gentleman from illinois, mr. ross come. the speake
dollars for education. it's the same kind of problem. we're not good at figuring out what alternatives are and as a result libya destabilized and a lot of the arms that went into libya, a lot of the forces that were militarized flowed not just into mali and algeria but across a huge chunk of northwest africa. as a result you see a huge destabilization that's affect in turn little tunisia in between algeria and libya, it has affected egypt. there is a whole section of africa that is very vulnerable to jihadist extremists. >> you know, i think that's what important here is that while it may have been unintended that this would empower a wide range of militarized forces, it's not only, quote, jihadists but a lot of people with a lot of guns. but it was not unanticipated. it was talked about widely. it was anticipated that it would happen more inside libya rather than over libya's borders, through algeria into mali but it was certainly anticipated this was exactly what was going to go on. by the time of the intervention, we should not forget inside libya, libya was an ally of the united st
in education and research and development, innovation. to get control of the energy future. all of that will be a part of the president's vision for the next four years. >> you know, bob schieffer mentioned earlier this morning the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, the president is proposing a number of changes to the gun laws in this country. how much a part of the president's resolve will that be in the months coming? >> well, the thing -- the president always said that, you know, you have to do many things at once when you're president, and that's a very important thing. we can't keep replicating these tragedies and it's not just the big tragedies, but the small, smaller strategy dtragedies than the streets every day. so he's determined to move forward on this package of laws. they're not the only things we need to do. some of the things have less to do with government and more to do with what we -- what we do in our home. what our children play and in terms of video games and what they watch. but certainly we need to do something about guns. we are hopeful that we're at a mom
done infrastructure, railroads and highways, caring for the vulnerable and the poor in education. and then you saw that the campaign rhetoric about the few and the many was not just campaign rhetoric. he tied it to the idea of america, that when we replaced the king, we didn't replace tyranny with the privileges or the few. and he kent through his campaign about we have to do it together not on the backs of the view. so i think we have calling on citizens as you're suggesting to act, to come forward and he was defending government. he was defending government in our time, that maybe it has its problems and it's work out, but essentially was telling citizens, i need your voice, i need your action. and he talked about immigration, finance reform, things that people didn't expect. but it's sort of the journey that's not finished rather than a policy-walking thing. so i think it's really the agenda for the next term and the awareness that he won't get it done from inside. he needs these characters from outside to come and is be part of the process. >> i'm very happy to have tom broka
and the second act of the book is largely chicago with his education in california, new york and boston thrown in some but largely chicago and that is when he recreate himself as a political been, so when you think about it we are all sort of created from a lot of different strengths but i can't think of anybody with a more fascinating mix them obama. >> host: tell us about the team here. >> i can't tell you how happy i am about the people in working with. i don't know swahili which is the mother tongue of this part of kenya and most people speak english, they all don't and the drive on the other side of the road and i would have been dead if i tried to drive myself plus there are no road signs. the places we've, i couldn't find in a million years and i'm pretty good at finding things, so i definitely needed a great driver and we got one. he is a friend and interested in politics. i needed somebody on the ground to help set up interviews and the national archives and elsewhere. i looked out and got ken who is 40-years-old, investigative journalist and kenya, very tough, straightforward, smart,
important it was to have an education outside, to be able to speak another language, and it would help me through my life in the future. i wanted actually to be an architect and an engineer like my uncles were, but because of the cuba -- instead of going to the university of miami, which i was accepted, i decided to go and fight for my country. c-span: what did you learn in pennsylvania about what your own interests were, in pennsylvania, when you went to school there? did you -- what did you begin to think were going to be your interests, and where did you go after school? >> guest: well, my interest when i went to high school first there was engineering and architecture, but as things turned different in cuba, back in 1959, when fidel took over, i concentrated my thoughts on being able to return to my county, and that is the thing that prevailed then and now. i think it is my main objective in life. that is why i went to the training camps in -- first, the one in the dominican republic, that was the first action that we had, and it was not with the agency at the time, it was back in 195
tock exchange, thank you. >>> the u.s. education department says it takes more than the standard four years for more than 20% of students to ini finish and get their deemployee mas. they credit the rise in graduation rate for the stiff competition for limited jobs. >>> an analysis of marrs' mclaughlin crater has scientists investigating new evidence that there was water on the red planet. using data from the mars reconnaissance orbiter, it may once have been a lake fed by an underground water supply. the findings are published in "nature geo science" and may push the search for ancient life on mars underground. >>> off-duty police officer in madrid is being credited as a hero this morning after rescuing a woman who fainted and fell on the city's subway tracks. the officer leaped into action and pulled the 52-year-old woman to safety. an oncoming train saw the trouble on the tracks and fortunately was able to stop in time. lucky day all right. it is now 7:12. let's go back to matt, savannah, and al. >> that's a nasty fall. natalie, thanks very much. here's the deal. you want to get the
. you have a good education system down there. i'm not sure i would necessarily turn it over it with all due respect to our friends in mississippi, the railroad is a good question you raised. federal government gave the land to the railroads to run railroad across the united states. talk about a false choice. the false choice is saying government doesn't do anything good. >> did i say that. >> i put words in your mouth. if you on with me more you're going to find out i'm going to put words in your mouth. martha: bob, mary katherine, look forward to with more fun. >> four years to get mad at him. >> don't hit too hard. martha: i like when you come up to the set. >> we do too. gave us 60 seconds notice from the basement. martha: good workout. bill: i thought you were a georgia girl? you're north carolina? >> i went to school in georgia but go dogs. martha: he is laughing. bill: iran claims that an american pastor imprisoned since september will be freed. his wife says don't buy it for a minute. why she says that report is just a flat-out lie. >>> plus as the gun debate rages we talk with c
's important to try to push it. the other piece we haven't talked about is the education reform and the drawdown overseas. >> well, there was a big idea, i think, in the speech today, and that was equality. that's what this speech was about. >> let's check in with wolf. >> the president is about to sign a proclamation. he's also about to nominate several members of his cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> all set? all right. i'm proclaiming peace, honor and good will towards men. >> amen. >> i'm sending a few nominations up. mr. charles headinger for defense, mr. john kerry, secretary of state, and mr. [ inaudible ] >> there you go. thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> so the president, once again, formally nominating members of his cabinet. chuck hagel to be secretary of defense, john kerry to be secretary of state, john brent. let's listen in to see what else he's saying. >> that's yours. >> so they have a little -- a few laughs, a little official business, the nomination of cabinet members, signing a proclamation. dana bash, what's going to happ
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